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CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 11:00am EST
useful just like a newborn is limited in skill, without an education or supporting the paradigm for a i, artificial intelligence, to educate them. >> host: can you elaborate on what the neocortex is as opposed to the brain? >> guest: the old brain and the new brain. the new brain is the neocortex. only mammals have the neocortex. these early mammals emerged over 1 hundred million years ago, the neocortex is the size of a postage stamp and is basically the outer layer, neocortex means new rind, of the brain and capable of thinking in a hierarchical fashion. >> host: that is the part of the brain you are focusing on. >> caller: -- >> guest: it has complexity 2. twenty-nine and change quickly they were able to adapt. that was not so much an advantage because the environment did not change quickly. it is the normal process of biological evolution, changing behavior over thousands of generations. it is good enough for non medallion species until the cretaceous extinction event sixty-five million years ago. we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world, something dramatic happened
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
of women, marriage has taken different paths in this country. for the college-educated we have a new model of marriage i call the see-saw marriage. this example is the obamas. they have a classic see-saw marriage where the men and women take turns being the family's main provider over the course of the marriage and this has led to a happy stable marriages, very low divorce rate among the college-educated, very long-lasting marriages, low likelihood of raising children alone. michele obama was a health care executive making a lot of money and barack obama was in law school doing public service and they have switched places where he is the main guy and she is the supporter and this is a pretty common pattern of marriage among the college-educated and it has proved to be a stable, good model where as for everybody else in america for the 70% of americans who don't have a college degree marriage is disappearing. people are not getting married. if they are getting married they have high divorce rate and rates of single motherhood are astronomical. it is largely because women are doing eve
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:05am EST
, stewards a scholarship and education education, disseminate ears of scientific discovery, champions of literature. however one defines knowledge today but could not have the merged and is not worth sustaining without the distribution of books and journals and other professional content. it goes without saying that wherever there is publishing there is copyright. senator keating was called at the jugular of the industry. quote when maria said that earlier this year i thought i have to attribute that to her and i would not do otherwise. [laughter] but it seemed to sum up what i have heard since i walked into this position three years ago. publishers some care more about making books and making money but there has to be returned. one of the big ceos said i gamble with other people's money. that is true of the consumer sector where you don't know what will work and rabat but it doesn't fly to the educational sector. everybody in the industry cares about copyright but there is enormous differences in between what goes on in the cage wealth market. that is very different where sales are m
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
will be on nationwide tv. describe the whole sense in education program. >> was that experience like? >> well, it is such an emotional , thrilling to more rewarding experience, both for my wife and i to teach these young men and some of them older, people who have committed heinous crimes, murder, what have you. they see the error of their ways and turn things around. that education process as well as the minister program is extremely important. a major name of one sort. warren buffett was there a few years ago because his sister, as a matter of fact, is a major supporter of hudson, the nonprofit organization. the year to this graduation ceremony and it's just incredible. opening and closing prayers. the old bible or what have you. they always have a valedictorian get up representing the graduates. usually maybe 20, 30 students who are graduating in ssc it's our best agree. and the valedictorian gets up and says, you know, i started off my parents own mother, the great hopes for me. then i got in the wrong crowd. i got into drugs are what have you. and then he says, and then i killed
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00pm EST
the women he called my darling. and was much better educated and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there was nothing this woman could not do too late linoleum or explain mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child she would handle the affairs at the milk while skinner was in england and ran the boarding house. and was intimately involved in her husband's business but she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to absorber these responsibilities. she took them on. but lizzy was a partner for the first wife died young. but she had raised the children as her own and given birth to age more and of the 10 children seveners still living and all were thriving. and with smart educated young women. but studying french with nine other than george to would be the prime minister of france. going one step further and nina went to college was up in poughkeepsie new york. the oldest, will, 17 was about to close out high-school at the prestigious seminary in east hampton and massachusetts. graduation was a few weeks away if he could make
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 10:00pm EST
with educators on c-span and people kept saying what is the real brian lamb like and he didn't want a biography done. and i finally got a contract and i came in and said well, and you know, where do you think and he said i guess i would let you and i can't say no on the station committed to open access to information how can i close things down. so it didn't interfere, kind of opened the village, gave me a list of high school friends said that was kind of fun to do. prior to that, a book that looked at individuals that changed national policies and as those that created major legislation because of their action to read estimate what do you teach at the naval academy? >> political science. the last 40 years we've almost always been the number one people don't assume that in a technical school we say we are the value added major because they get their technical education plus to get the social science education that i teach media and politics and courses in the congress and campaigns and the elections and i keep my finger in the american government course. we have a course congress in i
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm EST
mother and father through months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond hill georgia and the surroundisurroundi ng areas welcomes matthew home with tears, flags and staff salute. the streets were lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing it has memorial service at the methodist church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout, a local boy scout troop honored him by collecting pens and papers and sending them to mattheus unit map these unit in afghanistan. a dear friend who was involved in the media had a fission and the project began. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00pm EST
stable also had a school. there was education but like what percentage? i don't know. arthur bowen was very well, was obviously literate if he could have written that poem. mrs. thornton's had taught him to read and write but how common that was, i don't really know. it is very hard to say. but it was not unknown that black people were, you know, were literal, -- lit even slaves. anybody else? sure. >> who was mrs. thornton lived alone or who was she with? >> mrs. thornton, her husband had died. so she lived in her house with her own mother who had been a school teacher and who was very fond of arthur as well. in fact i think mrs. thornton's mother was probably the one who taught arthur how to read and write. so in her bedroom that night was mrs. thornton, her mother and maria bowen was anna thornton's personal servant and also slept in the same room as the two other women. so, i don't know, like i don't know if that was unusual. i, you can tell from the diary that anna thornton and maria bowen were very close. they ran that household together and, you know they had fights and all of t
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 11:15pm EST
, sex education, sterilization and the rights. in looking at these, we might begin to remind us first visible signals of the change are often the mistaken for the force. the wave which we see first is the most apparent but doesn't impelled the ship, the smoke we see first is the most apparent but it doesn't involve a locomotive. the left similarly seems to be the championship of the various causes however an independent to call for the lowering of the birth rate which is one of the first of the universal signs of the national decline. see also the attendant call from the left for the learning abolition of the requirements for citizenship. the left would say the traditional definition of such art an egregious example of american exceptional some, which is to say arrogance, but we first hour citizens of the world. but citizenship and ply as defined rights and obligations. what rights does an american have on north korea, iran, china, or for that matter indonesia and what rights does an american jew, gay or woman in chile and syria? what obligations we have to the french nation to sugges
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:00pm EST
, a budget plan that invested in our people, invested in the infrastructure, invested in education, and at the same time said we can find cuts in other areas and we can raise taxes on those who are doing very well. and what happened with that fair and balanced approach? what happened was the greatest prosperity in modern history. 23 million jobs, no more deficits, we got to a balanced budget and i remember saying to my husband my goodness, what's going to happen? there won't be any more u.s. government bonds because we're going to be out of the debt situation. we saw -- we saw it on the horizon when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back, backwards on rates across the board from the wealthiest to the middle to the poor, and he put two wars on a credit card and we are where we are where we are. and to add to this history, we all know that we're coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult, led by, unfortunately, some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury s
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am EST
separate schools. most of them were on our site. the idea was the state cannot make an educational opportunity available for one sex only. in any event, that left justice scalia as the lone dissenter in the vmi case. now, the case about the family medical leave act and the chiefs understanding that it was important not to make this a maternity leave, that it should be part of the workers life when you have a sick child, a sick spouse, a sick parent, you can take time off for that putting did the job in jeopardy. well, i'd like to say that i had something to do with it. i don't think that's too. i think a case that came before the court influenced him. but most of all, i think he was influenced by his granddaughte granddaughters. one of his daughters was divorced and she had two girls, and the old chief cut took responsibility for being a male parent figure for those girls. they loved him, and i think he, he thought about how he would like the world to be for them. >> when you think about this evolution, starting really didn't read versus reed in 1971, which was a case involving an
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
. someone, a woman who wanted to get a college education in the 1920s was in general thought to be pursuing that for her own personal betterment, and not for the purpose of having a career. was to become a better life, a better homemaker, a better mother in the future. that was the object of post secondary education, primarily. women did go into the teaching profession, and so carson certainly could've been a teacher. she could've taught biology, or writing eventually for that matter. that would've been a career avenue that would've been open to a. science was also more open to women than other disciplines were. the marine biological laboratory at, was a place where a lot of prominent women scientists study. one of carson's predecessors was another person who went on to actually become a writer, gertrude stein spent a couple of summers studying marine biology, which i find kind of interesting. but yes, carson's prospects would've a very circumscribed by the fact that she was a woman. i was talking order today with someone about her role and whether there was something that was gend
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 3:00pm EST
to annapolis which was getting a good education but preparing himself for a life to be a doctor like his two parents had been. to a chapter which is one of my favorites called "plato and socrates" which describes the relationship between he and paul in its saw, it enabled him, i think, to navigate the political rivers that he would have to cross. and he learned some techniques of breaking down, to be more an lettic and to think critically about issues. it's a remarkable relationship between the two men. and it will, ultimately, cause zumwalt some problems with his boss, admiral tom moore. because tom moore would soon come to resent the closeness that bud zumwalt had with paul. because oftentimes with respect to vietnam policy, bud was following out about policy before admiral moore would know antibiotic. and this eventually -- about it. and this eventually led moore to come up with this plan. no one had ever heard of any admiral who went off to vietnam at that time. it was sort of like the death knell for admirals. and the navy itself was in the bath water at that time except, o
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
develop a strong interest in paul jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innocences of james madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subj
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
. this is the protest the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, of industry, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 2:15am EST
education same thing. i mean, we're not figuring it out right for some reason. >> let me ask you on a personal note, were you a strong reader as a kid? >> i was a strong reader, a very good student, but i was not a big reader. >> when did that -- >> i grew up on comic books. >> did you? >> yeah. >> when did the book thing start? >> the book thing, really -- and i was a good student, but the book thing really happened by accident. i was -- i worked my way through school at a mental hospital outside of cambridge, massachusetts, and i worked a lot of night shifts, and i read like crazy. it was serious stuff. at that point, i was not interested in commercial fiction, and i read everything i could get my hands on, and then i started scribbling, and i loved it. i just loved writing stories. >> and for the kids out here, i'm sure a lot of them are wondering, i'll try to ask the questions, and then we'll turn it over to the audience, but of all the characters, which one do you think you're most like? ray or max or alex cross? >> i think i'm most like alex. we're both african-american -- [laug
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:15pm EST
roman invasion, and bill hooks, a famous writer, and also -- advocating for compulsory education for girls in pakistan who was tried and murdered. i'd like to make that comment. my condolences to your parents, and i love that. i love how you talked about the -- do not have to be -- more than capable of being trained to be able to defend themselves. and, yeah, so peace and love. >> host: matthew. >> guest: i appreciate that. i should also tell you that so many, matthew, of the people that got -- when we started writing "heros for my son" and i went on facebook or twitter and said please send me other heros and so many people have send me heroes. in fact one of the last heros in the book is a woman named will ma rude dolph, and i didn't know who she was. she was young girl who had polio, and the doctors said she would never be able to walk, ever, and her mom used to drive back and forth, take a bus for hours and hours trying to get her to doctors appointments, and they said, she'll never walk. final russian when she was a little girl, take herbarieses off, and she starts running, and s
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 9:15am EST
educated in the united states and he said i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edmonds said to him take me to the commander of the fort and that is exactly what he did. with his tongue begun in his side the fabulous four went through the battery, down an elevator, went through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of the guns of navarrone type situation. and the commanding officer's office and he decided to break through the door and the commanding officer gave him -- what you want? we would like you to surrender the 4 ridge. the commanding officer's -- he was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the telephone and said you are my prisoner. at that point, robert edmond had one of the greatest bluffs of world war ii, pull out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender. at that point, eight hundred men surrendered after rebroadcast that over the loudspeaker. incredible story of world war ii that is completely documented in the national archives. for his efforts robert englund received the bronze star. co
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:00am EST
list book that got a second wind and this was in the education of general david petraeus by paula broadwell. any comments on those books? >> it is funny refer to that book as a poorly amid this title about a second wind because after general david petraeus administration, that is exactly why her book got the second wind and why the paperback publication was pushed up. what it has done a little bit though is take away from the larger aspect of these books. when scandal rears its head, one focus is too much on that instead of the substance of the book. one thing worth pointing out especially in relation to the mark cohen and mark cohen was a pseudonym for one of the navy seals who was involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden, the book's publisher which is penguin press, they announced with only weeks to spare, i felt they did a very brilliant job of marketing that book. it didn't help or perhaps didn't hurt depending on who you ask that mark owens's real name was dutifully revealed by the media which than cost its own fire storm and the like but the upshot is many of these bo
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
education has a hurting on, i could read the writing on the wall. kodachrome gave us a nice bright colors command makes you think the world of sunny day. i've got a nikon camera. i love to take photographs. so mama, don't take my kodachrome away. [laughter] >> i'm glad you mentioned it. my essay in the book really tells the back story of the manbo families, by the open with paul simon's kodachrome. i open with that very lyric. because what i say is kodachrome does make you think all the world is a sunny day. but what if the story really isn't so sunny and that's the central problem in the central challenge and the sensual delight of these color photographs. adiabatic adding a mac >> is a very preset of observation. so billy was four when he left camp. he doesn't remember any of this. he had very fleeting memories. his family as was common among japanese american families, his parents never taught about this episode at all within. so he has no memories of this. he has no evidence dearness. he remembers going around looking for rocks with his grandmother. he remembers little things l
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 11:00pm EST
of the mission that killed osama bin laden and then there was a book in the education of general david petraeus by paula broadwell. sarah weinman, any comments on moe's books? >> guest: it's funny you alluded to miss broadwell spoke as a former title that got second wind because of course in light of general petraeus' resignation this broadwell's role in that, that's exactly why her book, why the paperback publication was pushed up. i think what it is done a little bit though is take away from the larger aspect of these books. when scandal rears its head it's focused too much on that rather than the substance of the book but one thing that is worth pointing out in relation to mark bowen and mark owen was a pseudonym for the navy s.e.a.l.s involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden is that the books publisher, penguin press, they announced that with weeks to spare and i felt they did a brilliant job of marketing that book. of course it didn't help depending on who you asked that mark owens real name was dutifully revealed by the media which then caused its own firestorm but t
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 10:10am EST
auguste educational institution not far from here there is actually an alger hiss share in the humanities. my colleague in the new criterion has been on every degree the chair of the humanities prompted to get it back to the president's team. i'm delighted to welcome you to the final panel commemorating the 60th anniversary of whittaker chambers so' "witness" and i think we have seen the most contentious question for last. what defines conservatives today. i think in the context of "witness," and the work of bill buckley, today means after the cold war. we've said a little bit about that already this afternoon. but i like to say a little more specifically about it now. so, after the cold war, that means after impossible confrontation of communism and said the to and stan she added in by the evil empire of the soviet union and the west, in his letter to his children which has been mentioned already come chambers said that in communism he saw, quote, the concentrated evil of our time. bill buckley looked upon the enormity of communism, and indeed come conservatives of all stripes could agre
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00pm EST
thing was only 2% could explain what the brown v board of education was about even though the answer was implicit threat so our kids don't know much history and a lot of what they know is wrong to read this book is based upon the work of great historians and you mention of great historians or doing some kind of work but we have a big sweep and because we are able to couple this with showtime documentary and a get more dramatic. disconnect it's like history one-on-one. why cannot be. i have to say when you read these history books it's not -- its coherent. there are no patterns. we don't understand how that works and kids get the dates, the detectors but the united states always comes out ahead. we can trash iraq twice. >> the concept is to go through the global history to see it on the franchise. >> he's all the world and kept saying to truman look how what we are doing looks to the russian soviets, and we don't have that ability to have some ability and certainly very helpful in the beginning. >> obama is entitled provocative plea. let's give the title you said you took a bad situation
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
some molecular biology for a master's, but it's clear that he is scientific education did not go in vain. when i got my copy i went to the chapter that i would be able to judge vest on the energy environment or chapter 5 conservation and clean energy chaos. i happen to love the liberation myself, so i got a freebie in that title and i was pleased to see the tape on the creasy aspects of the environmental policy favored by progressives from those that don't work to ruechel or heads that his attitude and don't get you clean. and they pointed out some points about water conservation where if you were worried about water conservation you wouldn't be looking at the shower heads and toilets because most of the water that is used as industrial for energy use and irrigation and so forth and you have to get all the way down to the 1% level when you talk about the consumer use of water that he would be trying to knock that down by a percentage or so by going to the smaller toilets and showers. so i am hoping that one of the things that we also discuss is one of my pet peeves which is the will
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
the education associations as sz -- i would be at sea for three weeks away from telephone internet and physical libraries yet i was in the middle of the research project on benjamin franklin the required me to read material and friend so i decided to use my time at sea to read a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules byrnes of around the world in 80 days first published in the newspaper serial in 1872. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on on the ship i slowly made my way to the book. by french was good enough to my surprise but i actually enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated its period details especially the nature of the protagonists they englishman racing around the world. and has remarked offhandedly travel services at could take a person round the globe in a period of 80 days. prove that he challenged him and he is off. that 80 day measure was only conceivable by the late 19th century and the age of sales getting sails getting around the world have taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship would have --
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:30am EST
connection was not to convert them, but to educate them. and to improve their lives and tangible ways because that's what they responded to positively. once he had the inside, he had what became the greatest university of her release. >> isn't still open? >> it is. it weathered many tech theories, but it remains open and stay that way. >> who owns it, who rents it? >> it is still run by a very impressive faculty of professors and administrators who are middle easterners and american. daniel liss and peter gorman who is a psychologist by training and shared with the important departments at the university of chicago before he took the shot of a couple years ago. >> is it coincidental uses direct consignment was that on purpose? >> he has a personal passion for the school because of his family connections. >> i can come in the american university, or who runs the? >> faculty air missile easterners. the vast majority of students. >> is it associated with religion, another school? >> is deliberately secular nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go their four-year? >> i have no idea. >> what would
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
, walled off from the outside world employing tens of thousands of less educated workers. a wonderful recipe for short-run productivity, a wonderful recipe for paying worker $5 a day. it was factories like this that made detroit quite possibly the most productive place on the planet in the '50s, but these were not a recipe for long-run urban regeneration because they don't need the city, they don't give to the city. they're a world unto themselves. when conditions change, and they always change, you just move the factories to places where it's cheaper. you have nothing left. and so as transportation costs declined, we moved these factories to lower cost locale, we moved them to the suburbs, we moved them to the right-to-work states and across the country. now, detroit still has not recovered from deindustrialization. in part, detroit had the worst of all possible worlds, it had a single large industry, a few dominant firms. those firms crowded out all local entrepreneurship, and the city has had a significant degree of problems ever since. they have 25% -- they've lost 25% of their po
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 2:05pm EST
free speech, stewards of scholarship and education, disseminate ears of scientific discovery, and champions of literature. however one defines knowledge economy today it could not have emerged, is not worth sustaining without the production and distribution of books, journals and other professional content. it goes without saying that wherever there is publishing there's copyright. senator keating called copyright the jugular of the book publishing industry. when maria said that earlier this year, i thought i have got to use that, a tribute that to her. and i certainly would not do otherwise. but it seems to me to sum up very much what i have heard since i walked into this position three years ago. there are a lot of publishers who care a lot more about making books than they do about making money. but given the structure of the industry there has to be return. one of the big six did say to me i gamble with other people's money. that is particularly true of the trade sector, the consumer sector where every book is different and you don't know what is going to work and what is not
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
administration running education programs for after being chancellor the university of colorado boulder people said was the first woman to be a the stage at a research university. i had a fight with ronald reagan even though i was a commissioner one of my latino women was the only other minority we would dissent when they would try to do something that was terrible. we had a big fight with him but i went to all of those. >>host: but president carter appointed you? >> yes. then there is a new department of education and i went back to teaching and that i was appointed. >>host: when did the clear it would be a permanent agency? >>guest: after the first year. the commission was set of sitting down to say we will just served, they did some hearings. the major power the commission has, when it does what it is supposed to do, it will listen to people and civil rights problems that they could not get anyone to pay attention. the federal government. nobody would pay attention. the first year they would go out and listen to the people. they have the power to subpoena any one. eisenhower said i w
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 11:15am EST
who have been educated to believe that this country stinks, that it was born in sin and continued to be -- pursue evil objectives, etc.. that is why i keep harping on this issue. i still think it is the major issue facing us, and conservatives at least not of all stripes i have to say i the only force in the country that can be relied upon to -- at least i think stop it, this particular history, i think, we can yell stop and succeed because we can draw on the deepest resources of this country's tradition to fight it and if we don't nobody elt me b whitaker chambers. the fact thatvbeaembsÁlizr=mñat everything was against him and how enormous courage. and ultimately prevail. that is a lesson we can all work out. >> god forbid i should be thought to be denigrating whitaker chambers. he was a great man and "witness" is a great book, but i do think that he never dropped the other shoe and a fight against communism, rereading "witness," i have been struck by how much he resisted seeing america as good. you can say relatively, he said communism was absolute evil and i believe that. i woul
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment secti
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
africa clearly did not fit the progress is a view of educated elite. and by their definitions, were close to quote life unworthy of life, unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony of this time, american movies followed a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism. god, fair play, and they avoided sensationalism, sexual situations and other taboo vices. american movies sold american exceptionalism, including quote puritanical moralism as one observer put it. they occasionally make fun of those values to the work of people such as buster keaton and charlie chaplin, but this was all done tongue-in-cheek and never meant to totally undermine the system itself. my 1930, the u.s. had 18,000 movie houses, and compared to france's 2400, and britain's 3000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood, and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europea
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 1:00am EST
started out as an enthusiast and then became a collect your and then became an educator through a web site and then ultimately through this book. the story of how i first discovered historic newspapers happened about five years ago. my wife and i took our first family vacation to galena illinois which is a cozy mississippi river town where on the main strip they there, we discovered a rare book shop. in that rare shop i found a nondescript container full of old newspapers. i picked one up and started reading it and with the april 21, 1865 "new york times." is reading about abraham lincoln and the reward for the capture of the conspirator. that moment triggered in me an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i seriously had never had. so for the next five years, it became this journey of meticulous kind of collecting of newspapers because i am from the midwest. i don't have convenient access to the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the original found in the libraries and institutions across the country and so i made it a point to try to
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 12:00pm EST
tinkering didn't have a college degree so often there's a sense of, well, we need stem education, and, absolutely, i think we do, but we shouldn't underestimate this sense of practical skill that are often passed down from generation, the people of fire who actually are doing things on the factory floor that account for a lot of globe's most successful innovation when it comes to fire suits. one of the pieces, as i said, is that our democratic culture in the business world gives us this competitive advantage of o more authoritarian manufacturing structure, particularly small and medium sized businesses because that allows them to economize production, and that allows them to customize products. the second thesis in the book is tracing a support of manufacturing back in american history, and the idea there's always been a role for government support of private industry. going all the way back to alexander hamilton. i tell people you don't have to read the "world the flat" to understand what we have to do in a global competitive world. read alexander ham hamilton's rt on manufacturing,
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
for an america of continental red, network transportation, widespread education and industrial might. at the same time these 12 terrible months revealed the dreadful cost of entry into that future. payable in blood and misery on battlefields from shiloh sharpsburg, do you bridge to fredericksburg. most of all though, 1862 was the year lincoln rose to greatness. never since the founding of the country has so much depended on the judgment, the cunning, the timing and the sheer physical endurance of one man. now how lincoln survived and ultimately triumphed through 1862 is a very good story but it takes a whole book to tell. tonight i would like to talk for a few minutes with you about why lincoln poured everything he had into the struggle. why was it so important to him to save the union? why fight a war that cost more american lives than all of our other wars put together? three-quarters of a million people dead and countless more wounded in body and in mind. to understand this story, i must take you back another 50 plus years before 1862, to a winter day in february, 18 nine. when ab
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 9:00am EST
, compelling educational benefits for them. that's it. s it is a what -- that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? now, i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, you know, the reason the court, you know, buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say, no, it's true, it's true. it really happened. now, increasingly these educational benefits -- which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education, you know, at best, are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that there are any eggal benefits. -- educational benefits. but i think it's also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is leaning this way, that even if there are some educational went fits -- benefits, they've got to be weighed against the costs that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination, right? i mean, something as compelling, something, if an interest is compelling, you've got to consider the inherent liabilities in the racial disc
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 12:00pm EST
educational stuff like the policy-making situations which i'm very interested in. it's a great thing washington, d.c. has all these things and c-span has covered it. >> c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 luft. >>> president obama meets with house and senate leaders from both parties this afternoon at the white house that meeting is scheduled for 3:00 eastern in the oval office. politico rights leader's side is hopeful there will be a breakthrough on preventing the tax increases and spending cuts scheduled to take effect on january 1st. earlier today senator tom harkin held and even outside of the capitol about the fiscal cliff. he called it a battle for the middle class. we will also hear from congressman chris van hollen and members of advocacy groups. >> are we ready? okay. good morning. all right. good morning. welcome to this cold morning press conference here outside of the senate office building. i am the executive director of network and i am one of them on the bus. we're here to continue the message, grizzlies to find a solution to the economic situation that
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:45pm EST
to which the library is a model of educating young people is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drive it to be candid the fundraising ability that john brings to this. john, thank you for your work and thank you for the introduction. [applause] i hope all of you will join calista and me in keeping mrs. rage anyone your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime working for this country. we cherish role while she continues to play a role here in the library. i couldn't come here without mentioning nancy for a minute. governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from you being mayor in san diego, to u.s. senator and leader in a variety of ways. i look to them as great people who represent a willingness to serve their state and country. an important way, and i want to say it's a family engagement out there. thank you both for serving the country. it makes a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i didn't know you would be with us. we're thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched what we cal
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
and that kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, few traditionally-fit to learn -- nutritionally-fit to learn, materially ready to learn. and that's the lie, or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and they say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to our flag, that that phrase, "liberty and justice for all," should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration, and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real. but right now we are lacking that sense of urgency, and we can't sit around and wait for elected leaders to do it. when i think about great movements in america, i don't really think they were led by elected officials. elected officials were often responding to the pressure or responding to the leadership on the ground, and that's really what we should be doing. when we're thub voting, conversations, debates, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and it seems that the word "p
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
that we are holding onto as we compete globally and how well we have done educating the people to take their place in the economy, and i would hope that whatever agenda comes forward we have an agenda that is deeply, deeply focused on adult learning, and of education, community colleges and finding more ways for people to constructively enter the economy. >> counselor? >> i would concur on those points. i'm grateful i live in a state that has a governor deval patrick and living in a country with president barack obama. one of the reasons you just stated in creating better access to both educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating all of those other disparities. it's important we not upset about the 99% of the 47% and just remember that there are people behind all of those percentages, and people that has been struggling and people living in poverty. if you talk about the shrinking middle class, who were the joining? and so i want a president and governor and a major that believes in making those critical investment in physical infrastructure and in people that s
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 3:30pm EST
security, title 1 programs of education for low-income children will be cut dramatically, most people, including the congressional budget office, our own congressional budget office, say that the combination of tax increases along with the decreased spending required under the budget control act will push our economy back into recession in the new year. so i don't agree that no deal is better than a bad deal. in this case, i repeat, no deal is the worst deal because it allows our country to go over the fiscal cliff and really hurts almost every american family in our country, in our economy, as a whole. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. it's not as if, if i could use the metaphor, that congress was going along in a bus and -- on a ride through the country and suddenly came to the end of the road and there was a cliff. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. we -- we -- we created this cliff ourselves a year and a half ago when we adopted the budget control act. and we created it for a very good reason: because we knew that we had proven ourselves incapable of making the compromises that
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30pm EST
technical education; plus, they get a social science education. i teach media, politics, the congress, campaigns, elections, and i like to keep the finger on the american government course. we srb since all we know, we have a required american government course, and the congress in its wisdom said, you know, what's going on at the naval academy when they don't understand civilian control of the military, and so in the budget hearings they required us to require a required government course. we always taught 75% of the students anyway, but now it's 100%. i like teaching the traditional american government course, but also teach the ethic the public service. the idea when you get a government check, you're in the military, there's extra responsibilities on you that normal individuals don't have. i keep government, the good stuff. >> host: one more project you're involved in? a book give away. what's that project? >> guest: it was a one-time, one shot activity at the rotary club, send books to an exchange student that we have in that point in time in africa, collected the books, the coun
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:00pm EST
the education of our children and the health of the market. .. [applause] our coverage of the international summit of the book continues now by a panel called the publishing world yesterday and today. it about one hour 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, ladies and supplement. it's a pleasure see so many of you, so many old friends here. i have a great privilege of being senior consultant for the librarian of congress, and i am also a writer and editor in chief and the world. and also a veteran of the publishing world. i have worked for many years as a senior editor and also at simon & schuster as well. i have been around the block. a bit of a veteran in august. but we have learned so many things in this conference so far. such a delight in such a pleasure to have heard the wonderful keynote speech. the report from the frontline with so many countries like russia and south africa, to learn that the first encounter between europe and the new world, but between the conquistadors and into was over a book. with thomas jefferson and the wondrous discussion register. such a vibrant discu
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
political campaign. but it talks about health care, education, the policy of capital punishment, which regardless of your philosophy isn't working. getting into responsible criminal-justice issues and rehabilitation, that sort of thing. i even recommended going on the metric system which is certainly something else and you said i'm running for vice president with governor gary johnson. it's amazing because she from a totally different perspective has come out to pretty much the same analysis that i have on all these important issues like education. today the talk you were wearing, and i like it by the way, deutsch shows how much to spend, where to go, what to buy. like all other consumer goods that is how we get reasonable bids for reasonable prices that education is completely different than that. it is funded from the top up so the federal government thinks of this money keeps a bunch of it and gives it to the state and keep a bunch of it for their administrative costs and give it to the school districts, give it to the schools, the use a lot of administrative costs and then i
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:45am EST
providing leadership on a day-to-day basis, the degree to which of this library as a model of educating young people is really remarkable. analog that goes to the energy, and to be candid, the fund-raising ability that john brings us. so, john, thank you for your work. [applause] >> i hope all of you will join close to me in keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she is a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country. and we all cherish her, as she continues to be active and continues to play a role here at the library. so i couldn't come here, and i mentioned nancy fortissimo their aisles with say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from being made in san diego to u.s. senator to governor, to a leader in a variety of ways. i look to pete wilson and to gale as great people who represent the willingness to serve the state and the country in an important way. i want to say, it's always a family engagement if you're out there, thank you both for serving the country but it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [ap
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:15pm EST
collector and then became an educator to her website called raglan in.com and ultimately through this book. the story how i first discovered historic newspapers have been about five years ago. at least when i took her first family vacation to illinois, a cozy mississippi river town, were on the main strip every discovered they were bookshop and in that rare book shop i found this nondescript container full of old newspapers, picked one up and started reading it and it april 21st 1865 near times. i was reading abraham lincoln assess the nation every word for the capture of his conspirators. that moment triggered in me an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i previously had never had. so for the next five years, it became this journey of meticulous collecting a newspapers because i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient access to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the originals found in the libraries and institutions across the country. so i made it a point to collect these because much like in a collectible, the
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 6:00pm EST
social services, education, research and infrastructure, all of the things that we need to grow our fragile economy. the calm act gives the office of management and budget discretion and flexibility to recommend what programs and what agencies and accounts to cut. if o.m.b. fails to do the job, then the sequestration across-the-board cuts kick back n of course the final word rests right here with us in congress. o.m.b.'s decision with be overridden by a joint resolution. every provision of the calm act o the senate. in fact, at one time or another, nearly every feature of this plan has been offered by both republicans and democrats, including president obama and speaker boehner. all i've done is pull them together to offer them has a compassionate alternative to what happens if we go over the fiscal cliff. true, from the very beginning i have favored a comprehensive solution to put our fiscal house in orderings something along the lines of the simpson-bowles. we don't have that luxury right now. but perhaps it will only soften the blow of the fiscal cliff but also give us a sense of
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments and developments. who is this a wee and landed folks like yo
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